Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 23, 2014

1892 Obituaries: April 8

Chicago Daily News April 8, 1892

Chicago Daily News
April 8, 1892

The following names appeared under “deaths” on page 8 of the April 8, 1892 issue of the Chicago Daily News:

Timothy Bergan
Margaret Blackburn
William Deroy
Annie Gregory
Dr. Charles F. Hunt
Capt. D. J. Humes
Frank P. Malone
Minnie Kelly
John J. McCormick
John Niston
Michael O’Connell
Michael James Quirk
Mary Schaughnessy
Anthony Scorone
Samuel W. Stevens
Patrick Walsh
Walter Anson Wills

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 21, 2014

Elise’s Divorce Lawyers

“And now on this (21st) twenty-first day of November 1874, comes the complainant by Jussen and Anderson, her solicitors…”

Anton Bidenharn did not respond to this Chicago newspaper posting

The statement above was transcribed from my 2nd great-grandmother’s divorce papers. It made me wonder:

  • Why would a 20-something German-speaking French woman from Ohio seek a divorce in Chicago?
  • How did Elise Biedenharn (nee Schmitt) choose these particular lawyers?

I started with the 1871 Chicago City Directory at ChicagoAncestors and clicked on “J”. Mr. Jussen appears on page 572:

“Jussen, Edmund, lawyer, 14 Lombard blk. r. 855 N. LaSalle, w 19 m 3 f 6 t 9, b Germany” which means Mr. Jussen’s office is at 14 Lombard and he lives on LaSalle Street which is in the 9th Ward. There are three males and 6 females at that residence; a total of nine people. And Mr. Jussen was born in Germany. So Elizabeth and this attorney (presumably) spoke the same language.

And Edmond Jussen’s partner? There were lots of Andersons in the 1871 Chicago city directory , but the one on page 50 stands out among the rest: “Anderson, H. H. lawyer, 82 LaSalle, r 291 Ontario, b Ohio“.  Ah, Mr. Anderson is from Ohio, just like Elise!

The birthplaces of these men may have had something to do with Elise choosing them to represent her. But why would a woman from Ohio seek a divorce in Chicago?

The answer appeared further in the divorce papers, on a page dated August of 1874, “Elise Biedenharn, of the City of Chicago, County and State aforesaid, respectfully represents that she has been and is now a resident of the said County of Cook for more than one whole year last past”.

Elise’s sister Anna-Marie (Schmitt) Plum lived in Chicago at this time and it appears the two woman were close. I’m supposing that Elise stayed with her sister and brother-in-law while she sought a divorce from Anton.

It appears that she may have become close to another person in the neighborhood as well. After her divorce was granted Elise married Chicago resident Jacob Mueller, the man who would become my 2nd great-grandfather.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 20, 2014

1894 Obituaries: November 20

The following names appeared in the “deaths” column of the November 20, 1894 issue of the Chicago Daily News, page 7; August Baker, John Patrick Coan, John J. Davoren, James Dignon, Theresia Hellman, Ellen Haughey, Oliver Barth Hansen, Richard Jones, Patrick Moran, John N. Miner, Annie Norton, Annie Stetcher (nee Dillon), Sylvia Schmitz, Thomas William Smith, William P. Trayer, W. B. Vent, Mary T. Weber, Mary Williams and Julius Weinberg:

Chicago Daily News November 20, 1894 page 7

Chicago Daily News
November 20, 1894 page 7

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 19, 2014

Family Disturbance in 1894 Chicago

Hmm…I wonder, did Gee really get the worst of it?

Chicago Daily News November 20, 1894 page 1

Chicago Daily News
November 20, 1894 page 1

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 16, 2014

Who is Aunt Tillie?

A newly found (and positively wonderful!) cousin recently shared a photograph taken in Chicago of our Schmitt ancestors:

A Schmitt family gathering

A Schmitt family gathering

When we first saw the photo, there was some discussion about who Aunt Tillie might be. Years ago, my new cousin’s aunt had guessed Aunt Tillie might be the sister-in-law of one of the women in the picture. We poured over so many photographs that for a short time afterwards, this one got lost in the crowd.

Then one day when I was driving home from work, a light bulb went off. I don’t think Aunt Tillie is a sister-in-law – I think she’s a sister!

My 3rd great-grandparents Nicolas and Marie-anne Schmitt had 13 children. All but two were born in France before the family immigrated to Ohio in 1854. The couple’s youngest child, Mary Mathilda was born in Cincinnati 06 Mar 1858.

1860 US Census OH Schmitt, Mathilda

1860 US Census OH Schmitt, Mathilda

In her first census, Mary Mathilda is listed below her siblings – some of whom appear in the picture above. Tillie’s siblings from left to right in the photo are; Pauline born 24 Mar 1850, John born 16 May 1841, and Anna (Tante Plum) born 04 Sep 1844.

This picture allowed me to see – for the very first time – the faces of ancestors I have been researching for years. Thanks to my positively wonderful new cousin!

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 15, 2014

1894 Obituaries; November 15

The following names appeared in the “deaths” column of the November 15, 1894 issue of the Chicago Daily News, page 9; Catharine M. Alloway, Mary Barry, James Breen, Adolph Dose, Johanna Caton, John Collopy, Henry Charles Erhardt, Tessie Flynn, Clara Hagen, Mrs. Robert Hartley, Thomas Heslin, John Hollister, Leonard O. Kuhn, William B. Mahoney, John C. McCarthy, Mary E. McFarland, Oliver H. Moe, Emmett Raymond Murray, Joseph Murphy, Mary Southerland, Freddie Staack, Babette Stege, John Sullivan, and Alexander Wilson.

Chicago Daily News November 15, 1894 page 9

Chicago Daily News
November 15, 1894 page 9

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 14, 2014

A Fortune Awaits Him

A young sea-faring man disappeared but his parents never forgot him. Whether you are a Chicagoan or a descendant of one, I think you’ll enjoy the last sentence in the article below. It appeared on the front page of the Chicago Daily News on November 15, 1894:

Chicago Daily News November 15, 1894 page 1

Chicago Daily News
November 15, 1894 page 1

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 13, 2014

An 1894 Wedding

An announcement of John H. Johnston and Fannie Whitted Culberson’s November 13th wedding appeared on page 9 of the November 15, 1894 issue of the Chicago Daily News:

CDN 1894 11-15 pg 9 snip 1

John was 45 years old and Fannie was 42 when they were married according to  the “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N76K-5XJ : accessed 17 Sep 2014), John H. Johnston and Fannie Whitted Culberson, 13 Nov 1894; citing Cook County, Illinois, , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1030245.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 12, 2014

Who Owns this Jewish Cemetery?

I shared the story of what I hope to be my first of many trips to Chicago’s Oak Woods Cemetery here.

Way in the back of Oak Woods we saw this:

Jewish Cemetery in Oak Woods

Jewish Cemetery at the back of Oak Woods Cemetery

If you look closely, you’ll see headstones hidden among what appears to be just a vacant field in the front of the cemetery:

DSC_0529

Jewish Cemetery near the Confederate Mound in Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago Illinois

Even the fence separating the Jewish cemetery from Oak Woods was in terrible disrepair:

Where's the rest of the fence?

What fence? Notice the headstone/tree combo?

I asked our Chicago Architecture Foundation tour guide why this section of Oak Woods wasn’t being cared for:

This isn’t part of Oak Woods. It’s a different cemetery.

She said as a courtesy, the wall surrounding Oak Woods had been extended to include the Jewish Cemetery:

See the wall separating the cemetery from the houses in the distance?

See the cement wall between the cemetery and the houses in the distance?

From other sources, I learned Oak Woods made multiple unsuccessful attempts to locate the owners of the Jewish Cemetery:

DSC_0535

What must the families of the deceased be feeling?

A coworker suggested looking for the synagogue to which those buried here would have belonged:

What if these were your ancestors?

What if these were your ancestors?

Any ideas about how we might find those responsible?

DSC_0540

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | November 11, 2014

Remembering Our Veterans

Thank you to all the young men and women who are missed by their families as they serve our country.

Daddy and Auntie Karen

Daddy and Auntie Karen

Follow this link to see photos I posted from my dad’s Army scrapbook on my old blog. Or search this site using the word “Army”. Perhaps one of your ancestors will be in some of the pictures my dad took while he served in the Army!

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