Posted by: Laura Aanenson | September 2, 2015

Ice Delivered by Horse-Drawn Wagon

Otto, Charles Ice Man WMThere’s a picture of a horse-drawn ice wagon on the Brooklyn Historical Society Blog today.

It’s their Photo of the Week post which goes on to explain how ice was harvested from frozen ponds and delivered to individual businesses and home. Interesting information about the day-to-day lives of our ancestors.

It was particularly interesting to me because my great-grandmother’s second husband Charles Otto drove such a wagon in Chicago.

The image above is a copy of the sign people would put in their windows if they wanted a delivery. They would turn the sign this way or that to show the quantity of ice they would like on that particular day.

Really makes me appreciate the everyday convenience of my refrigerator.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | August 28, 2015

Waking with the Dead

Coffee in hand, I head to my desk and start typing.

Last name. First name. Date of birth. Date of death. Cemetery section. Photo number.

buryiconRinse and repeat.

A second cup of coffee.

More names. More dates.

Lives begun. Lives ended.

People buried alone.

Families reunited for all eternity.

Infants and centenarians laid to rest side by side.

I wonder about the stories as I type the names and dates that appear on each headstone I photographed.

Immersed in my thoughts about the people I am memorializing for Find A Grave, I’m startled by my Fitbit‘s silent alarm.

It’s time to shower and get ready for work.

Time to return to the living.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | August 26, 2015

Final Resting Place for Edward Gorham?

The words “Accidentally Drowned” caught my eye as I read the front page of the Chicago Daily News from September 22, 1879:

Gorham, Edward

“At an early hour this morning, Edward Gorham, aged 25, a Canadian, employed in the Life-Saving Service, fell off the pier and was drowned. His body was recovered. He was single, and boarded at 33 Blair street.”

His body was recovered… and then what? Returned to his parents, possibly in Canada? Buried in Chicago where he had made his home?

Quick searches on Ancestry, ChicagoAncestors, FamilySearch, and Find A Grave turned up nothing on Edward Gorham. I did find some interesting information here about the Life-Saving Service which “compiled an impressive record during its brief history”.

But I want to know where this young man was laid to rest. Don’t you?

I’m hoping one of my research-savvy readers will help in the search for the final resting place of Edward Gorham.

The question of the day – where is Edward Gorham now?

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | August 24, 2015

Is Your Ancestor in this Newspaper Column?

So often we look for the leaves on our family tree on the obituary page of newspapers, but neglect to peruse the other pages in these publications.

Even in big cities, neighborhood activities were frequently reported in the newspaper. These brevities give us a glimpse of the day-to-day happenings in our ancestors’ lives.

Could one of your ancestors be mentioned in “The City in Brief” column? The following appeared on page one of the August 24, 1882 evening edition of the Chicago Daily News:

2015 08-24 newspaper snip“The City in Brief

Several boys, arrested for bathing in the lake, were discharged by Justice Wallace this morning.

David Nolan, aged 8 years, residing at 2518 Main street, was drowned last night off the Main street bridge.

Justice Brayton promptly discharged Mr. Hinckley, charged by J. R. Magie with unlawfully taking a paper-cutter.

Chris Haeger, a laborer at the North Chicago rolling-mills, was instantly killed last night at the mill by the breaking of a pulley rope.

Officers Michael Kinney and Patrick Cummings will be examined before Acting Chief Doyle, charged with abusing residents of String street.

James Murphy, an Illinois Central switchman, was crushed to death last evening while attempting to board a moving train at the foot of Lake street.

A steel mold exploded at the North Chicago rolling-mills, yesterday afternoon, and William Roach, Albert Dibbins, George Hay, and George Williams were injured, the two first named fatally.

Messrs. Potter Palmer, Marshall Field, N.K. Fairbank, and Herman Raster, appointed by the county commissioners to investigate charges against the county poor-farm and insane asylum, have absolutely refused to have anything to do with the matter.”

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | August 18, 2015

Stories under the Stones

Albert W. Schroeder and his wife Julia are buried in Chicago’s Mount Olive Cemetery. Their headstones were among 600+ photos I took for Find A Grave in that cemetery in April.

100_7616

The emblem on Albert’s headstone intrigued me. If the dates on his headstone are correct, Albert was only 19 years old when the Spanish-American War broke out. I wanted to know more about this man.

The first record I found on FamilySearch for Albert was his World War II registration card [1].

record-image_S3HY-67BS-P1S

From this I learned where and when he was born. I also learned Albert wore glasses, was five feet eight inches tall and weighed 142 pounds.

In other FamilySearch records I discovered Albert and Julia were married in Indiana in 1911 [2]. Why there I wonder?

Capture

The couple had two sons; Albert W. [3] who was born 09 Dec 1912 (and died the same year) and Robert Frederick born 21 May 1914 [4].

In 1918, Albert registered for the World War I draft [5]. How interesting that here he uses a middle name. I wonder why years later he went so far as to write “initial only” on his WWII registration?

record-image_33SQ-G14X-Z45

Although I didn’t find a definitive record for Albert’s Spanish-American War service, I did learn a few of the stories under these headstones.

 

  1.  “United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” database with images,FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V1KN-DD1 : accessed 15 August 2015), Albert W Schroeder, 1942; citing NAID identifier , NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm .
  2. “Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007,” database with images, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VNT6-9LN : accessed 15 August 2015), Albert W Schroeder and Julia M Metzner, 21 Jan 1911; citing , Lake, Indiana, county clerk offices, Indiana; FHL microfilm 2,414,593.
  3. “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878-1938,” , FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7M3-THX : accessed 15 August 2015), Albert W Schroeder in entry for Albert W Schroeder, ; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm .
  4. “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878-1938,” , FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N7M8-4PJ : accessed 15 August 2015), Robert Frederick Schroeder, ; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States, reference , Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm .
  5. “United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images,FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K6DN-QQ1 : accessed 15 August 2015), Albert William Schroeder, 1917-1918; citing Chicago City no 61, Illinois, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,613,747.
Posted by: Laura Aanenson | August 16, 2015

1891 Obituaries: April 9

The following names appeared on page 5 of the April 9, 1891 issue of the Chicago Daily News in the obituary column (see image in this post for details):

Chicago Daily News April 9, 1891 page 5

Chicago Daily News
April 9, 1891
page 5

  • Bertha Annas
  • George Barron
  • Gracie M. Bartlett
  • Thomas Barry
  • Andrew Theodore Block
  • Arthur Brennan
  • Henry W. Baniff
  • Elizabeth Clara Bunke
  • Margaret Bodett
  • Henry W. Braniff
  • Nellie Collins
  • Mettie Collins
  • Mary Elizabeth Collins
  • Eddie Collins
  • Emma Bennett Corran
  • William R. Duthie
  • Mary O. Evans
  • John Fall
  • William Fortune
  • Sister M. Justina Gormanly

Please note this is only a partial list of the death notices that appeared in this issue of the Chicago Daily News.

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | July 21, 2015

Grieving Statuary

Cemetery art and architecture often takes my breath away.

DSC_0592

Chicago’s Oak Woods Cemetery October 2014

And makes me wonder about the lives of the people who commissioned it.

DSC_0593

Chicago’s Oak Woods Cemetery October 2014

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | July 21, 2015

Stone Chairs

One can only imagine the heartache felt by Sarah Hickling when her beloved husband William died.

William had referred to Sarah as his “darling girl”.

Apparently their togetherness didn’t end with William’s passing.

Sarah had stone chairs made to face the memorial she had erected in William’s honor.

Oak Woods Cemetery October 2014

Oak Woods Cemetery October 2014

She may have gazed at the nearby pond while visiting with her late husband on long summer afternoons.

One can only imagine.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | July 19, 2015

1892 Obituaries: April 13

Chicago Daily News April 13, 1892  page 9 - deaths

Chicago Daily News
April 13, 1892
page 9 – deaths

The following names were listed under “deaths” on page 9 of the April 13, 1892 edition of the Chicago Daily News:

Johanna Christopher

Bartholomew James Donahue

Herman Fromhold

Edward McEwen

John D. Morrison

Mary E. O’Connor

See image in this post to read each obituary.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | July 16, 2015

Soldiers Laid to Rest

Civil War Memorial at Chicago’s Oak Woods Cemetery October 2014

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