Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 26, 2015

Pullman Employee Charles Youngberg

According to the Swedish Husförhörslängder or household examination records 1882 to 1885*:

ArkivDigital online Svenarum AI 13 1882-1885 Image 424 page 414

Karl John Ljungberg left Sweden for North America in 1883. He doesn’t appear in the Swedish Utflyttning or moving out records in that or surrounding years, but I can confirm he arrived in America.

Americanized Charles Youngberg worked his adult life for the Pullman Palace Car Company. I don’t know if he participated in the famous strike, but he was surely affected by it since he worked for the company during that time period. Years ago I ordered and received his employment records from the South Suburban Genealogical and Historical Society.

Charles and his wife Frieda nee Tolf appear together in the 1920 census. The couple’s daughter Myrtle, her husband Joseph Friend and their grandson Norman live with them:  1920 US Census IL Youngberg, Carl and Frieda nee Tolf

This would be the last census in which Charles appeared. He died 20 days after the census was taken.

From the Chicago Daily News January 28, 1920 page 30;

“Youngberg – Charles J., aged 58 years. Jan. 26  at home, 1421 E 75th st., beloved husband of Freda Youngberg, fond father of Myrtle Elvira and Lawrence Youngberg. Funeral Thursday Jan. 29 at 2:30 p.m. from late home to Swedish Mission Church, 74th st and Cottage Grove av., at 3 p.m.: interment Oakwoods. For information phone Stewart 77.”

For cousins trying to place Charles and me in our family tree:

  • my maternal grandmother was Harriette Kathlyn TOLF (1909-1954); one of three children born to
  • Julia Christine Thompson (1888-1964) and Harry Wilhelm TOLF (1884-1964); one of three children born to
  • Augusta Sophia Landstrom (1858-1936) and Peter August TOLF (1858-1929); one of eight children (including sister Frida Katrina who married Charles Youngberg 07 May 1887) born to
  • Carl Tolf (1824-1890) and Helena Christina Åman (1822-1901).

Interested in collaborating on Youngberg family history? I can be reached at where2look4ancestors [at] gmail [dot] com.

My 2015 organizational goal for Charles is to bring all of his documentation from out-of-date to up-to-date on Ancestry, Dropbox, Family Tree Maker, and in his paper file.

*ArkivDigital online Svenarum AI 13 1882-1885 Image 424 page 414

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 25, 2015

Grandpa was a Western Union Boy

John George Walton

John George Walton

My Grandpa’s family was poor. Really poor.

His father died when Grandpa was six years old. His mother took in laundry and cleaned other people’s houses to make ends meet.

All the kids got jobs as soon as they were able to work. By able, I don’t mean old enough to work. I mean physically capable of doing anything for which someone would pay you.

So my Grandpa became a telegraph boy. I remember him talking about it, but oh so vaguely. And it was so long ago.

I wish I knew more about his telegram delivering days. Did he have fun? Was it hard work? Dangerous? Did he have a bicycle or did he have to walk or run from the telegraph office to parts unknown in Chicago?

Was he proud of what he was doing for his family? Was he able to attend school and still make enough money to help out?

Did he deliver telegrams during World War I? After all, how long before the 1920 census had he been delivering telegrams? Did he ever deliver the news of a soldier’s death during World War I?

He was only 14 years old in January of 1920 when the census was taken.  January in Chicago. How in the world did he stay warm?

John Walton in the 1920 census

John Walton in the 1920 census

 

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 24, 2015

Why You Need a Genealogy Success Team

2015 01-24 Success TeamNearly four years ago I asked the universe for a virtual Success Team.

The universe responded with something a little different than what I had in mind.

Something much better than I could have imagined.

Instead of the four-person team I envisioned, it’s just Jenny and me. And that is perfect.

We follow the first four items on my 2011 five-part criteria:

  1. Be committed. Once you join, you must attend 95% of meetings.
  2. Be prepared to share your accomplishments or lack thereof…
  3. Be receptive to suggestions and generous with suggestions for others.
  4. Be sensitive to the privacy of your team members.
  5. Be prepared, organized, brief, and focused during each meeting.

But we’re terrible about the fifth. And that too is perfect.

We meander through our family trees, our to-do lists, and our week’s recaps. We ponder and we brainstorm. We hoot and holler with laughter. We give each other support and encouragement and lots of grief. We sprinkle it all with family history substance and a little sassafras. :)

For almost four years we have met by phone for an hour (or more) nearly every Saturday morning.

My family tree has never looked better. And Jenny and I have become much more than Success Team partners.

We are friends.

Thank you universe.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 23, 2015

Signatures of My Ancestors

One of my favorite genealogical finds is the signature of an ancestor. Imagine my excitement when I saw four at the same time!

My 2nd great-grandfather’s probate record contained signatures of all three of his children and that of his daughter-in-law:

1911 Mueller, Jacob Koebe Probate Record

1911 Mueller, Jacob Koebe Probate Record

Jacob Koebe Mueller (1844-1910) was the father of Otto Victor Mueller (1868-1912), Alfred Jacob Mueller (1879-1941), and Alma E. Mueller (1882-1967).

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 22, 2015

First Cousin Twice Removed

2015 01-22 1960 DUHA Marie Agnes watermarkedWhat a great smile!

That’s the first thing I thought when I saw this picture of Marie Agnes Duha, my first cousin twice removed.

Her mother was Agnes Magnheld Clarin (1891-1959), the middle of three daughters born to my 2nd great-grandparents Carl Larsson Clarin (1863-1924) and Bengta Johnson (1866-1895).

Marie was born in Chicago 14 Dec 1915. She lived in Park Ridge Illinois and worked as a precision artist at Croname Inc. She never married.

At the age of 67, Marie died in the Americana Health Care Center in Palatine, Cook, Illinois on the 9th of June 1995.

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 21, 2015

Peter Tolf and Augusta Landstrom Marry

At first we thought there were two couples; Peter & Christine Tolf and Adolf & Augusta Sandstrom. Isn’t that what it looks like?

Witnesses at Tolf/Peterson wedding

Witnesses at Tolf/Peterson wedding

But it was actually only one couple, Peter Tolf and Augusta Landstrom. They each brought a sibling to act as witnesses when Peter and Christine’s brother Frans Tolf married Matilda Peterson on the 31st of December 1881 in Batavia, Kane, Illinois.

Love was in the air; just three weeks later Peter and Augusta tied the knot:

1882 Marriage Certificate Tolf and Landstrom

1882 Marriage Certificate Tolf and Landstrom

For cousins trying to place Peter Tolf, Augusta Landstrom and me in our family tree:

  • my maternal grandmother was Harriette Kathlyn TOLF (1909-1954); one of three children born to
  • Julia Christine THOMPSON (1888-1964) and Harry Wilhelm TOLF (1884-1964); one of three children born to
  • Augusta Sophia LANDSTROM (1858-1936) and Peter August TOLF (1858-1929).

2015 01-21 Tolf Landstrom tree snip WM

Interested in collaborating on Tolf or Landstrom family history? I can be reached at where2look4ancestors [at] gmail [dot] com.

My 2015 goal for Peter is to learn more about the Batavia and Chicago churches in which he was involved.

My 2015 goal for Augusta is to determine when and with whom she traveled to the United States.

My 2015 organizational goal for both is to bring all of their documentation from out-of-date to up-to-date on Ancestry, Dropbox, Family Tree Maker, and in their paper files.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 20, 2015

A Norwegian and a Swede

No, this isn’t one of those jokes.

A Norwegian immigrant named Peter Thompson married a Swedish immigrant named Maria Fredrika Peterson in Chicago in 1883.

1883 marriage certificate of Peter Thompson and Maria Peterson

1883 marriage certificate of Peter Thompson and Maria Fredrika Peterson

How they met is a mystery.

Family lore has it that Maria worked as a house servant in San Francisco’s Nob Hill when she first arrived in America. How she came to be in California after leaving Sweden is another mystery.

Family lore goes on to say that Peter was a sailor. Presumably he lived in Chicago (since the couple married there) where he may have worked on the Great Lakes.

Peter and Maria, or Mary as she was known, appear together in only one census:

1900 US Census IL Thompson, Peter and Maria nee Peterson

1900 US Census IL Thompson, Peter and Maria nee Peterson

Peter’s whereabouts between this 1900 census and his death in 1938 is another mystery. Even what he did for a living in this census is a mystery.

Sites that list old occupations like this one, this one, and this one don’t include shapers. There is a shaper description here that offers a possibility; perhaps Peter was more involved in building ships that sailing on them. Another mystery.

For cousins trying to place Peter Thompson, Maria Fredrika Peterson and me in our family tree:

  • my maternal grandmother was Harriette TOLF (1909-1954); one of three children born to
  • Harry Wilhelm TOLF (1884-1964) and Julia Christine THOMPSON (1888-1964); one of four children born to
  • Peter THOMPSON (1857-1938) and Maria Fredrika PETERSON (1864-1941).
Peterson/Thompson tree

Peterson/Thompson tree

Interested in collaborating on Thompson or Peterson family history? I can be reached at where2look4ancestors [at] gmail [dot] com.

My 2015 goal for Peter is to determine where in Norway he was born.

My 2015 goal for Maria is to determine when and with whom she traveled to the United States.

My 2015 organizational goal for both is to bring all of their documentation from out-of-date to up-to-date on Ancestry, Dropbox, Family Tree Maker, and in their paper files.

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 19, 2015

Harriette Kathlyn Tolf 1909-1954

Harriette Kathlyn Tolf

Harriette Kathlyn Tolf born 19 Jan 1909

Every once in awhile I will stumble across a photo that makes me do a double-take.

Do you have any of those in your tree?

A picture of one person who looks so much like someone else in your tree you almost think it’s a… well…an impossibility?

This picture had that effect on me.

I never saw my grandmother in person. She died before I was born.

But when I came across this picture of her I did a double-take.

Because for a moment I thought the woman in the doorway was my daughter.

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 18, 2015

1892 Obituaries: April 30

The following death notices appeared in one column on page 6 of the April 30, 1892 issue of the Chicago Daily News; F. A. Bird, Paul Grantham, Lizzie C. Kennedy and part one of James Kilroy:

Chicago Daily News April 30, 1892 page 6

Chicago Daily News
April 30, 1892 page 6

James Kilroy’s death notice was continued in the next column and Mrs Mary A Benson was remembered:

Chicago Daily News April 30, 1892 page 6

Chicago Daily News
April 30, 1892 page 6

The following obituaries were on page 7 of the same paper; Oscar Carlson, James Carroll, Robert Black Clacker, Mary A. D. Clifton, Jacob Truman Dundore, Mme. D. Fortier, James Garrity, Margaretha Gans, Thomas Goodjohn, Charles P. V. Johnson, Edward Kahler, Mary Leghriege, George B. Lloyd, Henry Michel, Patrick McGrath, Francis P. McGovern, Selma Ostertag, Catherine O’Connor, Paulina Petschelt, Willie Potthoff, Annie Redmond, Daniel Rider, Mary Ann Roscoe, Elizabeth A. Smith and Patrick Touhy:

Chicago Daily News April 30, 1892 page 7

Chicago Daily News
April 30, 1892 page 7

 

Posted by: Laura Aanenson | January 16, 2015

Mariage de François Schmitt et de Elisabeth Grosse

One of my favorite online resources for French records is Archives de la Moselle.

Many of my Schmitt ancestors hail from the village of Hellimer in Moselle, Lorraine, France. Records for Hellimer are free (!) and available online from 1737 to 1791. When I want to see records from the period after 1791, I visit my local Family History Center.

Which is where I found this:

1804 MR Francois Schmitt and Elisabeth Grosse

The marriage record of my 4th great-grandparents

Transcription:

“Mariage de François Schmitt et de Elisabeth Grosse

Du vingt cinq Nivôse an Douze de la République, acte de mariage de François Schmitt cultivateur domicilié à Hellimer, né audit lieu le cinq février mil sept cent soixante et quatorze, fils de Claude Schmitt cultivateur et de feue Anne Marie Schmitt dudit Hellimer et de Elisabeth Grosse domiciliée à Virming, département de la Meurthe née audit le sept du mois d’ août mil sept cent quatre vingt un, fille de défunt Christophe Grosse cultivateur et de Marie Elisabeth Houpert dudit Virming.

Les actes préliminaires sont extraits du registre de publications qui ont été faites sans opposition à Hellimer les dix et dix-sept courant et à Virming les mêmes jours et les actes de naissance des époux des registres de Hellimer et Virming, de tous lesquels actes ainsi que du chapitre su de la loi du vingt six ventôse an onze il a été donné lecture par moi officier public aux termes de la loi.

Les époux ont déclaré prendre en mariage l’un Elisabeth Grosse, l’autre François Schmitt en présence de Marie Elisabeth Houpert mère de l’épouse, de Michel Vix cultivateur âgé de quarante six ans tous deux domiciliés à Virming département de la Meurthe, de Henry Grosse cultivateur à Léning, même département oncle paternel de l’épouse âgé de soixante quatre ans, de Claude Schmitt père de l’époux et de Michel Clavet cultivateur âgé de trente neuf ans, tous deux domiciliés à Hellimer, département de la Moselle.

Après quoi moi Jean Clavet maire faisant les fonctions d’officier public de Hellimer, ai prononcé qu’au nom de la loi lesdits époux sont unis en mariage et ont les époux et témoins signé avec moi, après lecture faite. l’épouse a déclaré n’avoir l’usage d’écrire.”

Translation:

“Marriage of Francis Schmitt and Elizabeth Grosse

[Prepared] on the 25th [day] of the month of Nivôse, year Twelve of the [French] Republic [Calendar], the marriage certificate of François Schmitt, a farmer living in Hellimer, born in that same town on February 5, 1774, son of Claude Schmitt farmer and the late Anne Marie Schmitt of Hellimer; and Elisabeth Grosse who lives in Virming, department of Meurthe born the seventh of August 1781, daughter of the late Christopher Grosse, farmer and Mary Elizabeth Houpert from Virming.

The preliminary acts are extracts from the publications [which] were made without opposition in Hellimer on the 10 and 17th of this current (month) and in Virming the same days and the birth certificates from Hellimer and Virming of the bride and groom (were shown to the official), all of which acts as Chapter xxx (?) of the Act on the 26th day year 11 (month) Ventose it was read by me, notary public under the law.

Spouses reported taking marriage vows are one Elizabeth Grosse, the other François Schmitt. Also present are Mary Elizabeth Houpert mother of the bride, and Michel Vix, farmer aged forty six years, both who live in Virming, Department Meurthe; Henry Grosse farmer from [the town of] Lening, same department, who is paternal uncle of the bride [and] sixty four years old; [the] father of the groom, Claude Schmitt and Michel Clavet farmer, aged thirty nine years, both living in Hellimer, [in the] department of Moselle.

After that I John Clavet, acting mayor functioning as a public officer of Hellimer, have pronounced the name of the law said bride and groom are united in marriage and the bride and groom and witnesses signed with me, having been read. The wife testified that she cannot write.

The actual marriage date was 16 January 1804.”

Isn’t it amazing how much genealogical information is contained in just one record? And the signatures; such treasures. I love French civil documents!

For cousins trying to place Francis Schmitt, Elizabeth Grosse and me in our family tree:

  • my paternal grandfather was Harold Clarke MUELLER (1908-1985); one of two children born to
  • Ellen Gertrude CLARKE (1883-1948) and Alfred Jacob MUELLER (1879-1941); one of two children born to
  • Jacob Koebe MUELLER (1844-1910) and Elizabeth SCHMITT (1847-1910); one of eleven children born to
  • Marie Anne GURY (1818-1870?) and Nicolas SCHMITT (1813-1876); one of eight children born to
  • Elizabeth GROSSE (1781-1826) and François SCHMITT (1774-1854).

Interested in collaborating on Grosse or Schmitt family history? I can be reached at where2look4ancestors [at] gmail [dot] com.

My 2015 goal for François and Elizabeth is to determine their causes of death.

My 2015 organizational goal for both is to bring all of their documentation from out-of-date to up-to-date on Ancestry, Dropbox, Family Tree Maker, and in their paper files.

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